Mtl5500 Series Barriers To Critical Thinking

1 Barriers to critical thinking

First, let’s briefly examine some barriers to critical thinking.

Take another look at the visual summary below on critical and analytical thinking, which was introduced at the end of Session 3. Note the warning sign next to the ‘black pit’ to the lower right of this figure.

Figure 1 A visual summary of critical and analytical thinking

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What are the common pitfalls or barriers to thinking critically and analytically? Some of these were highlighted in the visual summary, and include:

  • Misunderstanding. This can arise due to language or cultural differences, a lack of awareness of the ‘processes’ involved, or a misunderstanding that critical thinking means making ‘negative’ comments (as discussed in Sessions 3 and 4).
  • Reluctance to critique the ‘norm’ or experts in a field and consider alternative views (feeling out of your ‘comfort zone’ or fearful of being wrong).
  • Lack of detailed knowledge. Superficial knowledge (not having read deeply enough around the subject).
  • Wanting to know the answers without having to ask questions.

Why do you think being aware of these potential pitfalls is important?

As a critical and reflective thinker, you will need to be aware of the barriers, acknowledge the challenges they may present, and overcome these as best you can. This starts with an understanding of expectations. Some students feel anxious about questioning the work of experts. Critical thinking does not mean that you are challenging someone’s work or telling them that they are wrong, but encourages a deeper understanding, a consideration of alternative views, and engagement in thought, discourse or research that informs your independent judgement. At postgraduate level you will also need to read widely around a subject in order to engage effectively with critical and analytical thinking, and to ask questions: there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers, only supported arguments. This is at the heart of postgraduate study.

Critical thinking encourages you to be constructive, by considering the strengths and weaknesses of a claim and differing sides to an argument. It helps you to clarify points, encourages deeper thought, and allows you to determine whether information that you come across is accurate and reliable. This helps you to form your own judgement, and drives research forward.

People can find it difficult to think critically, irrespective of their education or intellectual ability. The key to understanding critical thinking is not only knowing and making sure that you understand the process, but also being able to put this into practice by applying your knowledge.

Critical and reflective thinking are complex and lifelong skills that you continue to develop as part of your personal and professional growth. In your everyday life, you may also come across those who do not exercise critical thinking, and this might impact on decisions that affect you. It is important to recognise this, and to use critical and reflective thinking to ensure that your own view is informed by reasoned judgement, supported by evidence.

Take another look at the visual summary. You will see two aspects to critical thinking: one focusing on the disposition of the person engaged in critical and reflective thinking, and the other concerning their abilities. Let’s focus here on dispositions. At a personal level, barriers to critical thinking can arise through:

  • an over-reliance on feelings or emotions
  • self-centred or societal/cultural-centred thinking (conformism, dogma and peer-pressure)
  • unconscious bias, or selective perception
  • an inability to be receptive to an idea or point of view that differs from your own (close-mindedness)
  • unwarranted assumptions or lack of relevant information
  • fear of being wrong (anxious about being taken out of your ‘comfort zone’)
  • poor communication skills or apathy
  • lack of personal honesty.

Be aware that thinking critically is not simply adhering to a formula. For example, reflect on the following questions:

  • How can you communicate with those who do not actively engage with critical thinking and are unwilling to engage in a meaningful dialogue?
  • How would you react or respond when you experience a lack of critical thinking in the media, amongst your own family members, colleagues at work, or on your course?

The MTL5500 range modules are versatile yet simple to apply; use the latest technology and yet are well proven.

These contrasting attributes stem from the progression of our expertise in the design and manufacture of isolators for intrinsic safety and the application of innovative technology to achieve the required separation and segregation of the circuits.

The MTL5500 (DIN-rail mounting) and MTL4500 (backplane mounting) isolators share a common design, differing only in the mechanical mounting and connection methods.

  • Compact modular design with DIN rail mounting
  • High packing density
  • Single and multi-channel I/O modules
  • 3-port isolation with low power dissipation
  • Compatible with MTL5000

The following modules from the terminated MTL5000 range; MTL5018ac, MTL5314, MTL5051 & MTL5053 have been retained until further notice. Supporting information can now be found in the table below. Click the following links for the:

For Product Certificates<click here>

For more information about MTL Functional Safety Management<click here>

For UL approved MTL5500 range availability <click here>

MTL5533 Product Termination Notice and 'Last time buy'
Statement issuedProductLast time buyReplacements and notes
06 September 2016MTL553331st March
2017
Convert to 2 x MTL5531

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